Mummy MOT 2016

The media tells us that most women are disappointed with the post natal check that new mums receive from their very busy GP.

The baby gets a good check over but you never seem to have chance to ask all your burning questions?

You’re left wondering if ‘things’ will ever be the same again.

When can I exercise? What should I eat? When will I lose my baby weight? Why is my tummy looking like I’m still pregnant?

The Mummy MOT is available at Birmingham Women’s Health and Pregnancy Physiotherapy Clinic, Harborne.

You have a whole hour to have your worries answered, your posture, tummy and pelvic floor checked.

You’ll receive advice on safe return to exercise, what you should eat to help you get your body back in shape and reassurance that everything is ‘ok’.

If things aren’t quite right you have the option of continued physiotherapy treatment with a female physio you have now spent time with.

For more information or to book and appointment please contact fiona@motivated-mums.co.uk

 

 

Mummy MOT

The media tells us that most women are disappointed with the post natal check that new mums receive from their very busy GP.

The baby gets a good check over but you never seem to have chance to ask all your burning questions?

You’re left wondering if ‘things’ will ever be the same again.

When can I exercise? What should I eat? When will I lose my baby weight? Why is my tummy looking like I’m still pregnant?

The Mummy MOT is available at Worcester Women’s Health Physiotherapy based at David Lloyd Worcester.

You have a whole hour to have your worries answered, your posture, tummy and pelvic floor checked.

You’ll receive advice on safe return to exercise, what you should eat to help you get your body back in shape and reassurance that everything is ‘ok’.

If things aren’t quite right you have the option of continued physiotherapy treatment with a female physio you have now spent time with.

 

Bounce Back after Birth

Mums-to-be and new mums come and find out what to do after you have had your baby to get your vavavoom back!

Come and find out how to start your post natal recovery as soon as you’ve had your baby by eating foods that will help your body recover and feel energised rather than ending up on the sugar roller coaster that a lot of new mums find themselves on.

You can start helping your pelvic floor recover from day one and slowly build up your strength again but in a safe and functional way.

As a women’s health physio, I will talk about your nutritional needs and your physical recovery as a new mum which includes discussing exercise and relaxation.

For more information, or to find out when the next course is, please contact fiona@motivated-mums.co.uk

 

Worcester Women’s Health Physiotherpay

Physio sessions are available at David LLoyd Worcester, Warriors Way at Junction 6 of M5

Pelvic health issues can be treated such as incontinence, chronic pelvic pain or prolapse.

If you’re a new mum, you may want the Mummy MOT which offers a full postural, spinal and pelvic floor assessment.

Why not call me today to have a chat about your concerns and learn what physio can do for you.

Fiona 07970974233

What is your pelvic floor?

The pelvic floor (PF), also known as the perineum, is the sling of muscles, and sphincters (openings) of your bladder & urethra, vagina and anus. You could liken it to the shape of a hammock.

It involves a network of tendons, muscles, ligaments and connective tissue that supports the contents of your abdominal cavity and literally stops them falling out!

When you tension your PF the sphincters should close keeping you dry.

As well as supporting the weight of the abdominal contents, the pelvic floor acts to resist an increase in the pressure in your abdomen (intra-abdominal pressure). This pressure is increased by coughing, sneezing, laughing, bending over and lifting, running and jumping.

Where is it?

The ‘hammock’ is suspended between the pubic bone at the front and the coccyx at the back and has a number of attachments around the hip and pelvis. The size of the pelvic floor resembles an open hand.